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ProAna Thinspiration

Posted in Articles, Eating Disorders

What Is Thinspiration and How Can “Pro-Ana” Websites Trigger Eating Disorders?

Thinspiration is a term used to describe images and writings that promote extreme slenderness as a body ideal. These materials frequently appear on pro-ana websites that treat thinspiration as a cultural norm. Research indicates that the vast majority of these websites promote eating disorders by providing detailed information on how to begin, maintain and hide dangerously unhealthy eating behaviors.

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Anorexia Athletica and Social Media

Posted in Articles, Eating Disorders

Social Media & the Rise of Anorexia Athletica

Despite no official recognition as a mental health disorder, anorexia athletica is nonetheless a dangerous phenomenon that seems to be spurred in part by social media.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Researchers Dig Deeper Into Neuropsychology of Anorexia

Recent findings from a team of Norwegian and British researchers indicate that girls and women with anorexia may compulsively check their bodies because they have unusual difficulty switching between mental tasks, although the evidence is far from conclusive.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Deep Brain Stimulation Promising Treatment for Severe Anorexia

An experimental procedure known as deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown promise as a treatment for severe anorexia nervosa. DBS is currently an approved treatment procedure for essential tremor, Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and obsessive-compulsive disorder, but it is being studied as a treatment for anorexia, chronic pain and certain affective disorders.  

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Posted in Eating Disorders

People With Anorexia Aren’t Motivated By Hunger Signals

The brains of women who have recovered from anorexia nervosa react differently to hunger signals than the brains of women who have never suffered from an eating disorder, according to new research from the University of California, San Diego.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Bulimia and Anorexia Alter Women’s Decision-Making Processes

Several mood-related factors contribute to altered decision-making processes in women affected by the eating disorders bulimia and anorexia, according to new findings from a team of Japanese researchers.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Does Anxiety Contribute to Depression in Women With Anorexia?

The presence of anxiety in a woman affected by anorexia nervosa can substantially heighten the chances that she will develop significant depression symptoms, according to recent findings from a group of British and Dutch researchers.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Activity Trackers Can Be a Danger for People With Eating Disorders

Activity trackers that monitor daily input and output of calories are helping many people jumpstart an exercise routine and become more active. In a society that has become increasingly inactive and overweight, activity trackers are generally considered to be a positive influence.

However, activity trackers can be a risk for people living with eating disorders or in the process of recovery from eating disorders. This is because the nature of these trackers and their emphasis on quantifying what we consume and what we burn plays right into the obsessive and compulsive nature of these disorders.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Pro-Ana Websites Fuel Eating Disorders

Thinspiration and pro-ana are terms describing a disturbing trend online and especially on social media that involves supporting people in developing eating disorders. Type either term into a search engine and you will find any number of sites, social media groups, chat rooms and forums dedicated to members supporting each other in the quest to be thin at any cost. Do these websites and groups cause people to develop eating disorders? Do they worsen the condition in someone who already has one? Do they hinder recovery? Researchers and concerned professionals are trying to find out.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Female Athletes at High Risk for Eating Disorders

The eating disorder risk that female athletes face is intuitive and counter-intuitive at the same time. On the one hand, it’s natural to assume that athletes know how to take care of their bodies as well or better than anyone else in the world. On the other hand, many athletes are under great pressure to train harder and longer than anyone else or to keep their body weight as low as possible. In a recent study of college students, eating disorders were three times as common in athletes compared to non-athletes. The incidence of eating disorders is likely even higher among professional athletes, where the stakes are more substantial and the pressure to perform even greater.

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