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Posted in Addiction Research

Food Can Be As Addictive as Drugs, Study Finds

To say that a food addiction is no different from a heroin addiction seems a little extreme. However, new research is showing just how similar all addictions are. Whether you can’t put down the doughnut, or you crave cocaine, there are things going on in your brain that are at the core of your addiction.

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Posted in Early Recovery

Women Abused as Children Twice as Likely to Suffer From Food Addiction

Food addiction is an unofficial term used to describe a relationship to food and eating that essentially mirrors the drug- or alcohol-related behaviors found in people affected by substance addictions. While the condition is not recognized by the highly influential American Psychiatric Association, significant evidence support its existence. According to the results of a new study published in May 2013 in the journal Obesity, women who have a history of either extreme childhood sexual abuse or extreme childhood physical abuse have a much greater chance of developing a food addiction than women who don’t have a history that includes these forms of abuse.

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Posted in Addiction Research

Binge Eating Can Lead to Other Addictive Behaviors

Addictions are not limited to alcohol or drugs. People can become addicted to multiple substances and habits including gambling, sex, and eating. Researchers are finding links between addictions and overall addictive behavior. In a few studies on binge eating, researchers found links between binge eating fatty foods and craving cocaine and marijuana. With further research, scientists may be able to better understand how a person’s loss of control over a craving influences their risk of developing an addiction.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Your Personality Affects Odds for Obesity

Obesity is a term used to describe a body weight high enough to significantly impair short-term health and increase a person’s risks for chronic physical or mental illness. Numerous public health officials have identified rising levels of obesity as one of the major threats to well-being encountered throughout a wide variety of social groups in the United States. According to findings published in 2011 by the American Psychological Association, certain key personality traits are highly associated with impulsive behavior and an increased risk for becoming obese. Other important personality traits apparently reduce individual risks for the onset of obesity.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Are Food Addicts Stigmatized?

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers at the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at Yale have looked into how the public judges people with an addiction to food.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Can’t Stop Eating Them? Food Companies Know It and They’re Doing Their Best to Keep You Hooked

If certain foods are as addictive for some people as drugs, then what do you call companies that manufacture foods in such as way as to make them as addictive as possible? Can food companies work something like the way drug pushers do?

A new book by a Pulitzer-prize winning reporter for the New York Times suggests that this may be the case. Michael Moss spent years studying how big food companies like Kraft, General Mills and Coca Cola actually “engineer” foods for taste not nutrition. Their goal is to create as many “heavy users” as possible, with heavy users being people who cannot stop eating favorites like potato chips and caffeinated sodas, possibly because they have developed addictions to them. Their other goal is to increase their “stomach share,” which is food company lingo for a portion of the profits of the food industry.

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Posted in Helpful Articles

The Psychology Behind Food Cravings

It’s no secret that dieting can be challenging and food cravings can make it even more difficult. Why do we get intense desires to eat certain foods? Although food cravings are a common experience, researchers have only recently begun studying how food cravings emerge.

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