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Posted in Addiction Research

Gambling Disorder, Alcoholism Feature Similar Impulsive Behaviors

Alcoholism and gambling disorder are well-defined examples of two recognized forms of addiction: substance addiction and non-substance-based behavioral addiction. Impulsive behavior is typically viewed as a core characteristic of both forms of addiction, although the specific types of impulsivity present may vary. In a study published in June 2014 in the journal Addictive Behaviors, a team of German and Dutch researchers compared the types of impulsive behaviors associated with alcoholism to the types of behaviors associated with gambling disorder. These researchers concluded that both forms of addiction produce a similar impulsivity profile.

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Posted in Addiction Research

Drug and Gambling Addictions Linked to Embezzlement

A corporate intelligence and security consulting firm that conducted a five year study that tied embezzlement to gambling and a desire to live a lavish lifestyle. Anecdotal evidence suggests drug addiction also plays a factor.

The Marquet Report on Embezzlement looked into 528 cases involving $100,000 or more in reported losses. In 2012 the average loss was about $1.4 million, and 58% of all the cases involved female embezzlers.

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Posted in Addiction Research

Which People Tend to Seek Treatment for Gambling Disorder?

Gambling disorder (compulsive gambling) is the name of an officially recognized non-substance-based addiction that features problematic and dysfunctional involvement in one or more types of gambling. As is true with other forms of addiction, many of the people affected by this disorder never seek or receive treatment for their condition. In a study published in April 2014 in the journal European Addiction Research, researchers from two German institutions sought to determine which individuals with diagnosable gambling problems are most likely to seek professional help. These researchers identified several factors that increase the odds that a given affected person will enter treatment.

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Posted in Addiction Research

Almost Winning Primes Gamblers’ Brains

Problem gamblers are people who have an addiction-like relationship to gambling activities that don’t typically lead to major life disruptions for most individuals. As a rule, seriously affected gamblers qualify for diagnosis of a mental health condition called gambling disorder. In a study scheduled for publication in May 2014 in the journal NeuroImage, a team of British and American researchers used brain imaging to find out if people affected by serious gambling problems have an unusually hard time making a distinction between winning a gambling game and “almost winning” such a game. A failure to distinguish between these two outcomes could increase the chance a person will ultimately meet the criteria for a gambling disorder diagnosis.

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Posted in News

Online Gambling Among Teens

In the past, a person that wanted to gamble required a trip to a brick-and-mortar casino or at least an invitation to play poker in a friends’ basement. However, with Internet gaming available any time via smart phones and computers, gambling is always just a click away.

As a result, gambling activity has increased significantly along with addiction, which can develop in the privacy of one’s home where the individual can gamble all day long.

Gambling used to be limited to adults, with minors not allowed in casinos. But now teens can gamble online with only a valid credit card.

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Child in front of television playing video games

Posted in Articles

Gaming Addicted Children at Higher Risk of Mental Health Issues

More than 200 million Americans play video games, accounting for over two-thirds of the population, with around 3 percent of these playing at a “pathological” level. Leftover stereotypes would have you believe that these are largely “geeky,” socially-inept teenage boys, but in fact, 47 percent of gamers are women and the most frequent game purchasers are around 35. Video games pervade modern culture, but experts from Australia are warning about the risk of video game addiction, pointing out that kids addicted to gaming are more likely to develop mental illnesses. Video game addiction is a relatively new phenomenon, but learning more about it and the associated health risks helps to understand the level of risk from epidemic-level gaming.

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