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Posted in Eating Disorders

The Seasons of Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are certainly not seasonal illnesses. People who suffer from these disorders do not have symptoms just a few months a year, like those who suffer from hay fever or another seasonal allergy. Nevertheless, there are times of year that are particularly sensitive or challenging for people with eating disorders, or with problematic eating habits that may develop into an eating disorder.

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Posted in Mental Health

So You Know a Rage-aholic? Dealing with Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Contrary to popular belief, “rage-aholic” is an actual disorder that affects up to 16 million Americans, although the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders -IV refers to it as the descriptive term “intermittent explosive disorder.” People diagnosed with intermittent explosive disorder, or IED, experience sudden attacks of rage, often for no reason. In some cases, specific triggers cause the onset of an explosive attack, but in many cases, there is no real source of the anger. It can be normal and even healthy for the average person to lose his or her temper after having to stay restrained for long enough, but for a person with IED, there is no restraint, only rage.

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Posted in Trauma and PTSD

PTSD: Relapsing

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that occurs as the result of witnessing or experiencing a terrifying event. PTSD is the result of a change to the body’s "fight-or-flight" response; feelings of anxiety persist in the absence of immediate danger. While most people feel some type of stress following a traumatic event, PTSD can interfere with a person’s daily functioning, and symptoms are felt over a long period of time.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

How to Spot Symptoms of an Eating Disorder Early On

Anorexia, binge eating disorders and bulimia usually surface around adolescence but boys and girls can also show signs of problems much earlier. According to a recent story, if you catch these kinds of problems early on you can prevent a lifelong battle with eating disorders, says Jill Layne, a social worker in Norfolk, VA.

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Posted in Eating Disorders

Traumatic Events Can Trigger Eating Disorders

A May issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing published an article which pointed to insufficient family support during times of stress as a causal effect in the development of eating disorders. The University of Minnesota study was based on interviews with 26 females and one male (ages 17-64 years) currently receiving treatment for eating disorders which had typically lasted around 20 years.

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Posted in Articles

Going Over and Over Bad Memories of Past Trauma Leads to Depression in Women

How a woman deals with negative memories can make her prone to depression, according to a new study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Ineffective ways of coping with memories of old traumas include trying to suppress them or doing the opposite – thinking about them over and over again.

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Posted in Articles

Sexual Addiction Recovery Can Involve Multiple Triggers

Sexual addiction, recognized by many therapists and psychologists as a diagnosable and treatable condition, may follow similar patterns of relapse as alcohol and drug addictions. Triggers that can bring a person back into relapse can include both emotional and physical factors.

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Posted in Early Recovery

Keep a Safe Distance From Former Substance-Abusing Friends

“Distance has the same effect on the mind as on the eye.” – Samuel Johnson, English author, poet, essayist, lexicographer (1709-1784)

Think of looking at something that’s off in the distance. You feel safe, because you are far removed from its presence and not affected by its action or inaction. Your eye transmits the image to your brain and your brain interprets and assigns meaning or perspective to the situation. When you look at the recommendation to avoid association with former friends who are still abusing substances, it’s perhaps helpful to think of yourself as looking at something off in the distance.

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